Upcoming Events

Fall 2015

Graduate Student Happy Hour
When: Thursday, September 10, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: Josie Woods Pub, 11 Waverly Pl.
What: Meet Carla & Jamie over some drinks and a couple appetizers to learn what we’ve got in store for the 2015-2016 academic year, like our exciting Medieval Manuscripts Workshop. Or just come for a free beer and a good chat with some new friends.

Reading Middle English Aloud
When: Wednesday, September 30, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 805
What: A low-key reading group that invites non-specialists and specialists alike to stumble over reading aloud short poems or excerpts from longer works, which we will provide along with beer and pizza. And possibly gummy bears. Just come with an appetite for some medieval fun! Titles of the readings will be posted here as they are chosen.

5th Annual Medieval Manuscripts Workshop: “Three Faiths: The Making of Medieval Holy Books”
Click here for a PDF of the Poster  (Or you can click here to see the JPG on our site)
When: Friday, October 9, 9:30am-2:00pm (registered participants only) and 6:00-8:00pm (open to the public)
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 106 (the “Event Space”)
What: An all-day manuscript extravaganza beginning with a morning hands-on workshop on the making of medieval books for registered participants only and ending with a panel of guest speakers who specialize on one of the Abrahamic religions and its medieval material culture.
Registration is now open. It closes at 5pm September 30.

Reading Middle English Aloud
When: Wednesday, October 21, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 805
What: A low-key reading group that invites non-specialists and specialists alike to stumble over reading aloud short poems or excerpts from longer works, which we will provide along with beer and pizza. And possibly gummy bears. Just come with an appetite for some medieval fun! Titles of the readings will be posted here as they are chosen.

Guest Speaker Stacy Klein (Rutgers), “Parenting and Childhood in The Fortunes of Men,” co-sponsored by the Anglo-Saxon Studies Colloquium
Click here for a PDF of the Poster (Or you can click here to see the JPG on our site)
When: Wednesday, October 28, 6-8pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 106 (the “Event Space”)
What: Anglo-Saxonist Stacy Klein will give a guest talk. Watch this space for a teaser.

Reading Early Middle English Aloud
When: Wednesday, November 4, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 805
What: A low-key reading group that invites non-specialists and specialists alike to stumble over reading aloud short poems or excerpts from longer works, which we will provide along with beer and pizza. And possibly gummy bears. Just come with an appetite for some medieval fun! Titles of the readings will be posted here as they are chosen.

Spring 2016

Graduate Student Happy Hour
When: Thursday, January 28, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: Josie Woods Pub, 11 Waverly Pl.
What: Brave the cold and snow to meet Carla & Jamie over some drinks and a couple appetizers to welcome you back from the winter break!

Guest Speaker Sarah Elliot Novacich (Rutgers), “Poetry Machine”
Click here for a PDF of the Poster 
When: Wednesday, February 10, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 106 (the “Event Space”)
Abstract: A number of Middle English alliterative poems have a high incidence of unattested words. This project proposes the thought experiment of approaching these words as generated through the formal constraints and requirements of poetic form, that is, of thinking of words as produced by a kind of internal poetic engine. In this talk, I look at the poem *Patience* to investigate the interpretive consequences of such a self generating dynamic, and to consider how we might think of poetic production as participating alongside other moments of the surprising profusion of new things.

Reading Early Middle English Aloud
When: Wednesday, February 24, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Event Space
What: A low-key reading group that invites non-specialists and specialists alike to stumble over reading aloud short poems or excerpts from longer works, which we will provide along with beer and pizza. And possibly gummy bears. Just come with an appetite for some medieval fun! Titles of the readings will be posted here as they are chosen.

Reading Old English Aloud
When: Wednesday, March 9, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Event Space
What: A low-key reading group that invites non-specialists and specialists alike to stumble over reading aloud short poems or excerpts from longer works, which we will provide along with beer and pizza. And possibly gummy bears. Just come with an appetite for some medieval fun! Titles of the readings will be posted here as they are chosen.

Reading Old English Aloud
When: Wednesday, April 6, 6:00-8:00pm (tentatively scheduled)
Where: 244 Greene St., Event Space
What: A low-key reading group that invites non-specialists and specialists alike to stumble over reading aloud short poems or excerpts from longer works, which we will provide along with beer and pizza. And possibly gummy bears. Just come with an appetite for some medieval fun! Titles of the readings will be posted here as they are chosen.

Guest Speaker Robert Mills (University College London), “Derek Jarman’s Medieval Modern: A Life in Ruins,” part of MARC’s Distinguished Lecture Series
When: Wednesday, April 27, 6:00-8:00pm
Where: 244 Greene St., Rm 106 (the “Event Space”)
Abstract: The aim of this talk is to bring Derek Jarman’s persistent ruin-gazing into focus. More specifically, I explore how the meanings Jarman attributed to ruins were filtered through a medieval-tinted prism. In many respects, this is unsurprising. Jarman is one among a plethora of artists, poets, novelists, tourists, and scholars who have discovered, in the remnants of medieval culture, a wellspring of meaning and sensation. And he is certainly not alone among modern artists in wanting to plumb the depths of the idea of ruin. Here I foreground the ethical and ecological dimensions to Jarman’s lifelong pursuit of ruins. Culminating in analyses of his 1987 feature The Last of England and his various gardening endeavors, the talk sheds light on the medieval underpinnings to these projects—notably Jarman’s encounters with the Old English poem The Ruin, and with passages in Bede’s Ecclesiastical History and Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls. Fragments such as these provided the filmmaker with a means of practicing what he called an “archeology of soul.” Excavating the medieval in the modern gave him a framework for negotiating history’s losses, cultivating, in the process, what he saw as the “life” in ruins.

2 thoughts on “Upcoming Events

  1. Pingback: Upcoming Event at NYU | My LIS654 Blog

  2. Pingback: Day 10 – Voyage of St Brendan | MedievalKarl

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